A very interesting documentary

http://www.pbs.org/pov/thelawintheseparts/full.php#.UjVSxMZtiKV

"The Law In These Parts"—about the Israeli military law system set up in the Occupied Territories. Catch it soon, because it’s going to expire on September 18th!

I’ve actually seen it! And very much recommend it.

kwthrq:

semiticsemantics:

kwthrq:

lodubimvloyaar:

The evacuation of the Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip was eight years ago this summer. 

It was the IDF’s largest non-combat operation in history.

People are crying from being evacuated from their homes. The Nakba must’ve been worse, and yet Palestinians are told to “get over it” because it was 65 years ago…

Undoubtedly it was worse then, just as it was worse for the Jewish refugees being forced out of their homes at the same time.

This was traumatic, but it’s different when your own army comes to safely pack you up and move you out, no matter how angry you may be about it.

But I remember this every year, because at the time, I supported Sharon’s decision to dismantle the settlements in Gaza. I was very hopeful that it was a step in the right direction. I got called a lot of names, and it wasn’t pretty, (at least I wasn’t cursed by kabbalists, which Sharon was) but like a lot of people, I had hope that something positive would follow.

It didn’t. Hamas torched nineteen synagogues, beginning as the last of the IDF troops rolled out, and the greenhouses left behind by the settlements were destroyed, when they could have been maintained and used to feed people.

These pictures, for me, represent a lost hope for things getting better. 

Yeah Hamas does a lot of deplorable stuff but the same could be said for the IDF who destroyed many villages, homes, mosques and churches not during the war but after armistice was established in order to make way for new Jewish towns when they could’ve also been used, but I’m not here for competing narratives. Hell, both events were bad. I just hate that we’re often told to “get over it” by many including the Israeli gov itself, and that we’re denied a right of return. I mean, if two states are established, we’ll either see the same or the annexation of the settlement blocs to Israel, but I say Jews are welcome to live amongst Palestinians are equals.

No one should ever have to be told to “get over” being forced out of their homes (though I do not mean to equivocate the situations). Kowther, I do hope your dream comes true of Palestinians and Jews being able to live wherever they wish in a binational state. Your hope gives me hope. 

(via somepalestiniankid)

thisiswhoiam0ahuman:

Palestine Festival of Literature held in Gaza Strip
 
The Palestine Festival of Literature (PalFest) was established in 2008 with the aim of supporting life in Palestine, breaking the siege imposed on Palestinians by the Israeli military occupation and strengthening cultural links between Palestine and the rest of the world.
Since 2008 an annual literary festival has been the center of activities which have brought dozens of influential literary figures from the UK, US and Arab world to teach workshops and perform in free public events. Three main speakers came to Gaza to participate in the Palestine Festival of Literature: Ali abu-Neama, Susan abulhawa, and Lina Attalah. Ali Abunimah is the co-founder of the award-winning online publication The Electronic Intifada, established in 2001. Abu- Nimah deplores the role of the Arab countries in lifting the blockade on Gaza. He expected the Gaza blockade to be lifted after Arab revolutions but to no avail. Susan Abulahawa is an American-Palestinian writer who was born to a family of 1967 refugees. She is an author, the founder and president of Playgrounds for Palestine, a children’s organization dedicated to upholding The Rights of Palestinian children. Susan believes in the importance of literature, and through her writings, she tries to shed light on the Palestinian narrative of the conflict. The new Gazan generation is starting to resist the Israeli occupation by taking control of the narrative through literature, blogging and activism to involve themselves in their lives and destiny and refuse others to speak for them. Palestinians resist in all possible ways and this time they also chose literature to convey their message of resistance. 

thisiswhoiam0ahuman:

Palestine Festival of Literature held in Gaza Strip

 

The Palestine Festival of Literature (PalFest) was established in 2008 with the aim of supporting life in Palestine, breaking the siege imposed on Palestinians by the Israeli military occupation and strengthening cultural links between Palestine and the rest of the world.



Since 2008 an annual literary festival has been the center of activities which have brought dozens of influential literary figures from the UK, US and Arab world to teach workshops and perform in free public events. Three main speakers came to Gaza to participate in the Palestine Festival of Literature: Ali abu-Neama, Susan abulhawa, and Lina Attalah. 

Ali Abunimah is the co-founder of the award-winning online publication The Electronic Intifada, established in 2001. Abu- Nimah deplores the role of the Arab countries in lifting the blockade on Gaza. He expected the Gaza blockade to be lifted after Arab revolutions but to no avail. 

Susan Abulahawa is an American-Palestinian writer who was born to a family of 1967 refugees. She is an author, the founder and president of Playgrounds for Palestine, a children’s organization dedicated to upholding The Rights of Palestinian children. Susan believes in the importance of literature, and through her writings, she tries to shed light on the Palestinian narrative of the conflict. 

The new Gazan generation is starting to resist the Israeli occupation by taking control of the narrative through literature, blogging and activism to involve themselves in their lives and destiny and refuse others to speak for them. 


Palestinians resist in all possible ways and this time they also chose literature to convey their message of resistance. 

(via somepalestiniankid)

fala7idreams:


A Hamas prisoners’ association has turned this prison cell in Gaza City, which had been used by Israeli security services to keep Palestinian prisoners, into an exhibition open to Gaza residents. April 11, 2013.
(Photo: REUTERS/Suhaib Salem)

fala7idreams:

A Hamas prisoners’ association has turned this prison cell in Gaza City, which had been used by Israeli security services to keep Palestinian prisoners, into an exhibition open to Gaza residents. April 11, 2013.

(Photo: REUTERS/Suhaib Salem)

(via stay-human)

thepalestineyoudontknow:

Palestinians across the country commemorate Land Day ( March 30,2013 )

Every year, on March 30, Land Day is held in Palestine to commemorate the land protests of 1976 and to recognize the Palestinian struggle over land.

On 30 March 1976, thousands of Palestinians gathered to protest the Israeli government’s plans to expropriate 60,000 acres of Palestinian land in Galilee. Six Palestinians were killed in the ensuing confrontations with Israeli police and hundreds were wounded or jailed.

Even though this years protest and activities were smaller and not like always , it was suppressed by israeli forces  ( see Unlikely Jerusalem village takes the lead on Land Day)

-( see captions of pictures)

(via beneathunknownbones)

kamranzaib:

Breaking the Silence 
Breaking the Silence is an organization of Israeli veterans who served in the IDF since 2000 and aim to raise awareness amongst the public about the reality of everyday life in the Occupied Territories.
 
 

kamranzaib:

Breaking the Silence 

Breaking the Silence is an organization of Israeli veterans who served in the IDF since 2000 and aim to raise awareness amongst the public about the reality of everyday life in the Occupied Territories.

 

 

(via somepalestiniankid)

yafilasteen:

silly-nanners:

globalpost:

JERUSALEM — A rocket fired from the Gaza Strip landed near the city of Ashkelon in southern Israel, the first breach of a cease fire since the last Gaza conflict.
“The rocket fell early in the morning near Ashkelon and did some damage to a road, without hurting anyone,” police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld told Agence France Presse.
The incident is the first attack since the end of an Israeli operation in late November, when more than a thousand rockets were fired into Israeli territory from the Gaza strip in reaction to the assassination of a Hamas military commander.
GlobalPost Senior Correspondent in Israel, Noga Tarnopolsky, said the al-Aksa Martyr’s Brigade, the armed branch of Fatah — the political party of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas — has taken responsibility for the act.
Israel: Gaza rocket lands in Ashkelon
Photo by AFP/Getty Images

Ya’ll seriously need to adjust the photo that you’ve accompanied to this post. 
Thats a photo of Palestinian officers in Gaza (after their headquarters were decimated by an Israeli bomb). The ignorant fools that are reading this will automatically assume this photo shows the “hamas rocket damage” poor Israel is suffering from.
But alas, couldn’t be further than the truth.

^^^^

It says right in the article that "[t]he rocket fell early in the morning near Ashkelon and did some damage to a road, without hurting anyone." While Hamas’ rockets fired toward civilian populations are absolutely no laughing matter and have resulted in a culture of fear for those living in many places in Southern Israel, the above photograph in no way accurately depicts the extent of damgage they cause. There are plenty of valid ways to convey the results of Hamas rockets. This is not one of them and is, ultimately, deceitful. 

yafilasteen:

silly-nanners:

globalpost:

JERUSALEM — A rocket fired from the Gaza Strip landed near the city of Ashkelon in southern Israel, the first breach of a cease fire since the last Gaza conflict.

“The rocket fell early in the morning near Ashkelon and did some damage to a road, without hurting anyone,” police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld told Agence France Presse.

The incident is the first attack since the end of an Israeli operation in late November, when more than a thousand rockets were fired into Israeli territory from the Gaza strip in reaction to the assassination of a Hamas military commander.

GlobalPost Senior Correspondent in Israel, Noga Tarnopolsky, said the al-Aksa Martyr’s Brigade, the armed branch of Fatah — the political party of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas — has taken responsibility for the act.

Israel: Gaza rocket lands in Ashkelon

Photo by AFP/Getty Images

Ya’ll seriously need to adjust the photo that you’ve accompanied to this post. 

Thats a photo of Palestinian officers in Gaza (after their headquarters were decimated by an Israeli bomb). The ignorant fools that are reading this will automatically assume this photo shows the “hamas rocket damage” poor Israel is suffering from.

But alas, couldn’t be further than the truth.

^^^^

It says right in the article that "[t]he rocket fell early in the morning near Ashkelon and did some damage to a road, without hurting anyone." While Hamas’ rockets fired toward civilian populations are absolutely no laughing matter and have resulted in a culture of fear for those living in many places in Southern Israel, the above photograph in no way accurately depicts the extent of damgage they cause. There are plenty of valid ways to convey the results of Hamas rockets. This is not one of them and is, ultimately, deceitful. 

(via somepalestiniankid)

Gaza Parkour

Palestinian youths practice their parkour skills. Parkour, originally from France, is an urban and rural practice that aims to move from one point to another as quickly and effectively as possible by physical and mental skills that require a solid workout. (Photo EFE) December, 2, 2011

(via navajomoose)

Four years ago, today, Israel begins Operation Cast Lead

stay-human:

In three weeks around 1,400 Palestinians were killed in the Gaza Strip. Over 300 were children.

May their memories be a blessing.

44 percent of those surveyed believe that the Palestinians’ “most vital goal” first of all is to end the Israeli occupation, and the establishment of a Palestinian state in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, including East Jerusalem. Some 33 percent of those surveyed believe that the most vital goal is to ensure the right of return of Palestinian refugees, and 14 percent believe it is to build a religious society on Islamic lines.

The poll was carried out between December 13 and 15 in 127 Palestinian localities in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with some 1270 adult participants.

Haaretz’s short report on poll on Palestinian people’s opinions 

(Source: ‘ Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research (PSR), headed by Khalil Shikaki’ - *though I think there is a confusion that - Jerusalem Report quoted probably same exact poll last week …)

Few journalists on the ground reported the ‘impression’ that - much people in the West Bank are actually highly apathetic - most concerned about economy and not interested in being politically partisan about PA or Hamas. 

Conflicting - or not so consistent pieces of reports and characterizations. None can take the position of ‘final/credible’ answer (characterization). 

(via akio)

(via akio)