tripleacontent:

Location of places hit in Gaza. Where are people supposed to go?

tripleacontent:

Location of places hit in Gaza. Where are people supposed to go?

(via jurhfalastini)

standwithpalestine:

Palestinians celebrate a ceasefire agreement between Palestine and Israel in the streets of Gaza City (top photograph) and Ramallah by handing out sweets and releasing fireworks, Tuesday August 26th, 2014. (Mohammed Salem / Mohamad Torokman / Reuters)

(via jurhfalastini)

sabrwasumud:

At least 370,000 children in Gaza are in need of specialized psychiatric and psychosocial support following Israel’s latest onslaught on the besieged enclave. The catastrophic level of hatred they have witnessed and experienced in 29 days alone is tragic beyond words.

Palestinian children are not taught to hate by their parents, cartoons or classmates. They witness terrifying, fierce, all-consuming hate firsthand from the illegal occupiers who unleash unprecedented terror against them since the day they are born. 

They see it every time Israeli soldiers raid their homes to beat, torture, kidnap and detain their fathers, brothers and family members. They see it every time illegal Israeli settlers uproot, burn and cut down their families’ olive trees. They see it every time an Israeli soldier intimidates and humiliates their family at a checkpoint. They see it every time a sniper shoots a friend in cold blood on their way home from school. They see it every time a bulldozer, tank or missile decimates the only home they’ve ever known, destroying their sense of safety and security with a made-in-the-USA stamp of approval.

Hate is not inborn; it demands existence. Palestinian children are categorically reviled and abhorred since their birth. Unimaginable depths of terror, destruction and systemic violence have entrenched their entire existence. 

They are not taught to hate. 

"It is not the unloved who initiate disaffection, but those who cannot love because they love only themselves. It is not the helpless, subject to terror, who initiate terror, but the violent, who with their power create the concrete situation which begets the ‘rejects of life.’ It is not the tyrannized who initiate despotism, but the tyrants. It is not those whose humanity is denied them who negate humankind, but those who denied that humanity (thus negating their own as well). Force is used not by those who have become weak under the preponderance of the strong, but by the strong who have emasculated them." 

— Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

(via sarajevomoja)

They call us now.
Before they drop the bombs.
The phone rings
and someone who knows my first name
calls and says in perfect Arabic
“This is David.”
And in my stupor of sonic booms and glass shattering symphonies
still smashing around in my head
I think “Do I know any Davids in Gaza?”
They call us now to say
Run.
You have 58 seconds from the end of this message.
Your house is next.
They think of it as some kind of war time courtesy.
It doesn’t matter that
there is nowhere to run to.
It means nothing that the borders are closed
and your papers are worthless
and mark you only for a life sentence
in this prison by the sea
and the alleyways are narrow
and there are more human lives
packed one against the other
more than any other place on earth
Just run.
We aren’t trying to kill you.
It doesn’t matter that
you can’t call us back to tell us
the people we claim to want aren’t in your house
that there’s no one here
except you and your children
who were cheering for Argentina
sharing the last loaf of bread for this week
counting candles left in case the power goes out.
It doesn’t matter that you have children.
You live in the wrong place
and now is your chance to run
to nowhere.
It doesn’t matter
that 58 seconds isn’t long enough
to find your wedding album
or your son’s favorite blanket
or your daughter’s almost completed college application
or your shoes
or to gather everyone in the house.
It doesn’t matter what you had planned.
It doesn’t matter who you are
Prove you’re human.
Prove you stand on two legs.
Run.
— "Running Orders" by Lena Khalaf Tuffaha (via theremina)

(via jurhfalastini)

redphilistine:

Imagine your house has just received a “door knock” from the Israeli army (a small missile that causes enough damage short of complete demolition that Israel uses to “warn” Palestinians to leave their homes). You grab whatever you can think of in the 1-2 minutes before the real missile hits. You’re out the door, hoping you and your children are far enough away so that you won’t get hurt by the shrapnel. And there’s some western journalist standing there with his camera pointed at you, taking pictures of your fear and misery. Imagine the absolute humiliation of that moment. You’re about to lose everything and someone wants to document it for the edification of white people in America, who will preen over Israel’s “merciful” consideration.

(via jurhfalastini)

A very interesting documentary

http://www.pbs.org/pov/thelawintheseparts/full.php#.UjVSxMZtiKV

"The Law In These Parts"—about the Israeli military law system set up in the Occupied Territories. Catch it soon, because it’s going to expire on September 18th!

I’ve actually seen it! And very much recommend it.

kwthrq:

semiticsemantics:

kwthrq:

lodubimvloyaar:

The evacuation of the Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip was eight years ago this summer. 

It was the IDF’s largest non-combat operation in history.

People are crying from being evacuated from their homes. The Nakba must’ve been worse, and yet Palestinians are told to “get over it” because it was 65 years ago…

Undoubtedly it was worse then, just as it was worse for the Jewish refugees being forced out of their homes at the same time.

This was traumatic, but it’s different when your own army comes to safely pack you up and move you out, no matter how angry you may be about it.

But I remember this every year, because at the time, I supported Sharon’s decision to dismantle the settlements in Gaza. I was very hopeful that it was a step in the right direction. I got called a lot of names, and it wasn’t pretty, (at least I wasn’t cursed by kabbalists, which Sharon was) but like a lot of people, I had hope that something positive would follow.

It didn’t. Hamas torched nineteen synagogues, beginning as the last of the IDF troops rolled out, and the greenhouses left behind by the settlements were destroyed, when they could have been maintained and used to feed people.

These pictures, for me, represent a lost hope for things getting better. 

Yeah Hamas does a lot of deplorable stuff but the same could be said for the IDF who destroyed many villages, homes, mosques and churches not during the war but after armistice was established in order to make way for new Jewish towns when they could’ve also been used, but I’m not here for competing narratives. Hell, both events were bad. I just hate that we’re often told to “get over it” by many including the Israeli gov itself, and that we’re denied a right of return. I mean, if two states are established, we’ll either see the same or the annexation of the settlement blocs to Israel, but I say Jews are welcome to live amongst Palestinians are equals.

No one should ever have to be told to “get over” being forced out of their homes (though I do not mean to equivocate the situations). Kowther, I do hope your dream comes true of Palestinians and Jews being able to live wherever they wish in a binational state. Your hope gives me hope. 

(via jurhfalastini)

thisiswhoiam0ahuman:

Palestine Festival of Literature held in Gaza Strip
 
The Palestine Festival of Literature (PalFest) was established in 2008 with the aim of supporting life in Palestine, breaking the siege imposed on Palestinians by the Israeli military occupation and strengthening cultural links between Palestine and the rest of the world.
Since 2008 an annual literary festival has been the center of activities which have brought dozens of influential literary figures from the UK, US and Arab world to teach workshops and perform in free public events. Three main speakers came to Gaza to participate in the Palestine Festival of Literature: Ali abu-Neama, Susan abulhawa, and Lina Attalah. Ali Abunimah is the co-founder of the award-winning online publication The Electronic Intifada, established in 2001. Abu- Nimah deplores the role of the Arab countries in lifting the blockade on Gaza. He expected the Gaza blockade to be lifted after Arab revolutions but to no avail. Susan Abulahawa is an American-Palestinian writer who was born to a family of 1967 refugees. She is an author, the founder and president of Playgrounds for Palestine, a children’s organization dedicated to upholding The Rights of Palestinian children. Susan believes in the importance of literature, and through her writings, she tries to shed light on the Palestinian narrative of the conflict. The new Gazan generation is starting to resist the Israeli occupation by taking control of the narrative through literature, blogging and activism to involve themselves in their lives and destiny and refuse others to speak for them. Palestinians resist in all possible ways and this time they also chose literature to convey their message of resistance. 

thisiswhoiam0ahuman:

Palestine Festival of Literature held in Gaza Strip

 

The Palestine Festival of Literature (PalFest) was established in 2008 with the aim of supporting life in Palestine, breaking the siege imposed on Palestinians by the Israeli military occupation and strengthening cultural links between Palestine and the rest of the world.



Since 2008 an annual literary festival has been the center of activities which have brought dozens of influential literary figures from the UK, US and Arab world to teach workshops and perform in free public events. Three main speakers came to Gaza to participate in the Palestine Festival of Literature: Ali abu-Neama, Susan abulhawa, and Lina Attalah. 

Ali Abunimah is the co-founder of the award-winning online publication The Electronic Intifada, established in 2001. Abu- Nimah deplores the role of the Arab countries in lifting the blockade on Gaza. He expected the Gaza blockade to be lifted after Arab revolutions but to no avail. 

Susan Abulahawa is an American-Palestinian writer who was born to a family of 1967 refugees. She is an author, the founder and president of Playgrounds for Palestine, a children’s organization dedicated to upholding The Rights of Palestinian children. Susan believes in the importance of literature, and through her writings, she tries to shed light on the Palestinian narrative of the conflict. 

The new Gazan generation is starting to resist the Israeli occupation by taking control of the narrative through literature, blogging and activism to involve themselves in their lives and destiny and refuse others to speak for them. 


Palestinians resist in all possible ways and this time they also chose literature to convey their message of resistance. 

(via jurhfalastini)

fala7idreams:


A Hamas prisoners’ association has turned this prison cell in Gaza City, which had been used by Israeli security services to keep Palestinian prisoners, into an exhibition open to Gaza residents. April 11, 2013.
(Photo: REUTERS/Suhaib Salem)

fala7idreams:

A Hamas prisoners’ association has turned this prison cell in Gaza City, which had been used by Israeli security services to keep Palestinian prisoners, into an exhibition open to Gaza residents. April 11, 2013.

(Photo: REUTERS/Suhaib Salem)

(via stay-human)