bloglikeanegyptian:

okay the whole burqa thing is actually pissing me off now

it’s not just

cultural appropriation

it’s going to create an even more hazardous effect on the already unstable dynamic of female empowerment in the middle east like

women are already struggling between being thought of as westernised or being thought of as oppressed

when you start making the burqa a western thing or a fashion accessory or hell even a symbol of ‘protection from objectification’ you put even more pressure on women who are struggling NOT to be objectified by the burqa or women who continuously have to prove over and over that the clothing they wear doesn’t change their self-respect or the respect they deserve

next you’ll have arab men pointing at lady gaga and saying “look even the white people know you should cover up!11!” and then it just negates the entire spiritual aspect of choosing to veil for God and it’s just

really shitty all around

STOP

asker

fuckyeahsoftzionism asked: ohhh ok. i thought he would want the daughter to *take off* her hijab because she might be bullied for being muslim in the way a woman wearing a miniskirt is supposedly more rape-able. but i think the intention is different for the articles of clothing: wearing a hijab is cultural/religious while frowning on miniskirts is patronizing and misogynist.

I think it’s patronizing and misogynist for any man to tell a woman how to dress.  But when it comes from a father to his daughter, and he isn’t truly forcing her to put on anything (but, like my parents would do, just wait till I feel bad for disappointing them), I have less of a problem with it than if it comes from elsewhere.

But in any case, people don’t talk about those poor girls whose fathers tell them not to (but don’t force them not to) wear miniskirts as oppressed.  But the idea that a Muslim father might tell his daughter to (but not force her to) wear the hijab or cover up more is shocking and a symbol of all that is oppressive and backwards about Islam and the developing world.

Edit:

I do, however, hear a lot of the language used when describing Orthodox Jewish girls who dress according to the rules of tzniut, though not with the same intensity I hear when people talk about Muslims.

Western Oppression.

mayflowrs:

A teenage girl is going out to hang out with her friends, and then her dad catches her at the door and tells her to wear jeans; because he believes that her mini-skirt is too short and revealing.

He isn’t ordering her to stay home, to stop seeing her friends, or, even, to not have a good time. His parental instincts happened to set in, because he is prudent and worried about her well-being— which is tied to the perception she carries of herself, her intention, and how others will perceive her. 

Now, let’s assume that he never threatened her or lay any ground rules if she failed to comply to his demands. She can either say no and then willfully leave the house, or she can change and then go about her day as she pleases. He has no intention of punishing her. But she may, haplessly, face future consequences that would place her in an imposable situation that may spiral beyond her power and control. 

Is this girl oppressed under this naseeha [advice]? 

Now, change the “dad” into Allah (swt) and the “mini-skirt” into a hijab/modest wear.

How about now?

misandrwitch:

“Ball So Hard” T-Shirts & Hoodies by AutumnGrace | Redbubble
Same as the first one but now without the purple background!

If it’s difficult to read in this image, it says, “Hijabis in Paris,” on top and, “Ball so hard Sarkozy wanna fine me,” on the bottom.

misandrwitch:

“Ball So Hard” T-Shirts & Hoodies by AutumnGrace | Redbubble

Same as the first one but now without the purple background!

If it’s difficult to read in this image, it says, “Hijabis in Paris,” on top and, “Ball so hard Sarkozy wanna fine me,” on the bottom.

(via misandryad)

Christian-centrism is real…How people see…

resident-stranger:

“Ehmagawsh nuns are so adorable! I love Sister Act/The Sound of Music!”

“ehmagawsh, they’re so oppressed! YOU’RE SO OPPRESSED AND YOU DON’T EVEN KNOW, LET US SAVE YOU!!!”

For real though, nuns cover the exact same parts of their bodies as hijabis and Orthodox Jewish women, but no one is concern-trolling them. Nuns also live with severe restrictions on their personal lives that Muslim and Jewish women do not. I can count on one hand the articles by “feminists” about concerns over nuns and the church that controls them. I don’t have enough fingers and toes to count the “feminist” articles about “oppressed” Muslim and Orthodox Jewish women.

Feminism means acknowledging the autonomy of women and their rights to make their own choices. Some women choose to be nuns, some choose to wear hijab, and some choose to dress tznius. Calling women who choose to cover themselves a certain way “oppressed” is un-feminist. Only picking women of minority (in the West) religious groups to call “oppressed” is incredibly Christian-centric.

end rant.

all these serious posts, I don’t know what’s gotten into me…

(via resident-stranger-deactivated20)

My way of Tznius

sheynem-nign:

I overheard a conversation from two Chassidish women in Boro Park gossiping among themselves. They were commenting on another woman who passed by’s tznius level and how they considered it “tasteless”. One women said, “How does she consider herself religious if she shows her bare knees like that?” The other woman quickly agreed and continued to criticize the woman even more till every single minor flaw was pointed out.

Dressing tznius is very important part of serving Hashem, but I believe, everyone has their own standards of worshiping and serving our great Creator. I don’t make the assumption than one who wears 100 denner seamed palm tights is more holy than a woman who wears black thin tights.  Hell, I WEAR seamed tights and the thickest denner, and I’m no ehrlich either!  (Not even close!) 

Read More

(via sheynem-nign-deactivated2012123)

readyokaygo:

Tunisia, Turkey, and Syria have various burka and niqab bans, but France is the Islamophobic one? There are serious double standards here that people do not care to discuss.

If this was directed at me, I oppose any country’s ban on the niqab, burqa, or any form of the hijab.  However, we cannot separate a country’s people from their history.  France has a history of colonialism, Islamophobia, and xenophobia directed at Arabs and Berbers especially and Muslims and Middle Easteners in general that is obviously not shared by Tunisia, Turkey, and Syria.

(via readyokaygo-deactivated20130325)

youngerjewishatheist:

I have a feeling i’m going to start unconsciously seeing this pic in my head whenever i hear a jewish girl say “i follow the laws of tzniut and it doesn’t burdern how i dress. All i have to do is wear clothes that cover my skin!”. The women in the ultra-orthodox communities dress how the men who made the laws of tzniut had pictured it. That’s the reality. Anything short of it is not tzniut, but rather, just an inner desire for dressing modestly.

Please stop telling women what tzniut (modesty - the Jewish equivalent of hijab) is.  I am so tired of hearing secular and religious men saying the same thing:  we know what modesty is, we know what your religion is, we know what you should dress like.
Trust us.  We are capable of dressing ourselves and we are capable of following our own religion.

youngerjewishatheist:

I have a feeling i’m going to start unconsciously seeing this pic in my head whenever i hear a jewish girl say “i follow the laws of tzniut and it doesn’t burdern how i dress. All i have to do is wear clothes that cover my skin!”. The women in the ultra-orthodox communities dress how the men who made the laws of tzniut had pictured it. That’s the reality. Anything short of it is not tzniut, but rather, just an inner desire for dressing modestly.

Please stop telling women what tzniut (modesty - the Jewish equivalent of hijab) is.  I am so tired of hearing secular and religious men saying the same thing:  we know what modesty is, we know what your religion is, we know what you should dress like.

Trust us.  We are capable of dressing ourselves and we are capable of following our own religion.

(via youngerjewishatheist-deactivate)

mehreenkasana:

thepoliticalnotebook:

On Sunday, Fatma Nabil became the first female news presenter to appear on Egyptian state television wearing a head scarf. Under Mubarak’s rule women could not take on-camera jobs while wearing Muslim head garb, and despite the fact that many sued and even won, the rulings were ignored. (Don’t read this as any implicit support on my behalf for President Morsi, Egypt’s Islamists or even for Egyptian state television… what I do very much support is the fact that women who wish to wear the headscarf while in pursuit of their own career are free to do so.)

“[V]eiled anchors were severely discriminated against. There were many veiled women with the right qualifications but they weren’t allowed to appear on television,” said Sally Zohney, a member of Baheya Ya Masr, an Egyptian women’s rights movement founded after the uprising against Mubarak. [x]
More power to Fatma Nabil’s choice.

mehreenkasana:

thepoliticalnotebook:

On Sunday, Fatma Nabil became the first female news presenter to appear on Egyptian state television wearing a head scarf. Under Mubarak’s rule women could not take on-camera jobs while wearing Muslim head garb, and despite the fact that many sued and even won, the rulings were ignored. (Don’t read this as any implicit support on my behalf for President Morsi, Egypt’s Islamists or even for Egyptian state television… what I do very much support is the fact that women who wish to wear the headscarf while in pursuit of their own career are free to do so.)

“[V]eiled anchors were severely discriminated against. There were many veiled women with the right qualifications but they weren’t allowed to appear on television,” said Sally Zohney, a member of Baheya Ya Masr, an Egyptian women’s rights movement founded after the uprising against Mubarak. [x]

More power to Fatma Nabil’s choice.